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About Senior Corps 
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Hurricane Volunteer Support Fund
In the wake of the recent hurricanes, the Corporation is coordinating volunteers to assist with repair and relief efforts in areas affected by this devastating storm. Your donation will support volunteers in providing food and shelter, managing donations, helping victims get necessary assistance, and long-term rebuilding efforts.
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USA Freedom Corps Partnering to Answer the President’s Call to Service
 
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About Senior Corps > What is Senior Corps? >
 
History, Legislation, and Budget

 

The three national Senior Corps programs – Foster Grandparents, RSVP, and Senior Companions – have unique histories, and each was developed to meet a specific need. But all were crafted on the same belief that older adults are valuable resources to their communities.

Each of the Senior Corps programs is authorized under the Domestic Volunteer Service Act of 1973, as amended in 1999.

The Foster Grandparent Program began on August 28, 1965, as a pilot program designed to engage people over 60 with some income limitations in community service. The program quickly revealed the positive impact these thriving older Americans have on children with either exceptional or special needs, and grew in scope.

The Senior Companion Program began its life in 1968 as part of the Department of Health, Education and Welfare and Administration on Aging. In March 1973, President Richard Nixon asked Congress to expand the role of low-income older volunteers who provide person-to-person services.  Seven months later, the Senior Companion Program was signed into law.

RSVP was an outgrowth of efforts by private groups and government agencies to create opportunities for engagement, activity, acquaintanceship, and growth for older Americans. One of the earliest programs was the Community Service Society of New York, launched as a pilot project in 1965 on Staten Island. The project involved a small group of volunteers who were dedicated to serving their communities in a variety of ways. The success of their efforts led to an amendment to the Older Americans Act, creating RSVP as a nationwide program in 1969.

Senior Corps

In 1994, President Bill Clinton signed legislation creating the Corporation for National and Community Service, bringing the full range of domestic community service programs under the umbrella of one central organization. The three programs—Foster Grandparents, RSVP, and Senior Companions—were brought together as Senior Corps. Along with AmeriCorps and Learn and Serve America, Senior Corps became part of the newly formed Corporation for National and Community Service.

Budget

Information on the Corporation for National and Community Service’s budget can be found at http://www.nationalservice.gov/about/role_impact/budget.asp.

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