Can I Collect Social Security Benefits If I Never Worked?





For the majority of senior citizens in the United States, the social security benefits program is a primary source of income which is needed pay for housing, food, medical expenses, and other expenses. While it is widely available, it is largely intended for people who have worked and contributed to the system. However, there are ways that you can obtain social security benefits even if you have never worked.

Disability

One way that you can collect social security benefits if you have never worked is if you are disabled. The social security benefits program is also available to people who are disabled and unable to work a job that is sufficient enough to provide an adequate stream of income. Disabilities covered under this vary significantly and can include blindness, paralysis, life threatening illnesses, and mental disabilities.

Spousal Benefit

Another way that you can collect social security benefits if you have never worked is if you have a spouse who has worked and qualifies for social security, but passes away. There is a social security clause known as the Survivors Benefit which is designed to provide a stream of income to the surviving spouse in the event that the benefit recipient passes away. This benefit will continue to be received throughout the rest of your life.

Elderly

You could also qualify for social security benefits if you are elderly. Through the Supplemental Social Security Benefits clause, you could receive social security if you are elderly and have no other means to support yourself. This portion of the benefit is often minimal and only meant to provide you with basic needs required to live a basic lifestyle.



5 Responses to “Can I Collect Social Security Benefits If I Never Worked?”

  1. Mary says:

    Can a person that needs breast cancer treatments qualify for medicaid after she turned 65 years old in January 2012. They gave her medicaid only until she turned 65 and then they took it away. This person was told she didn’t qualify for social security as she was mostly a housewife and hardly worked. Which according to this website she should have at least gotten half of what her husband is receiving. And can she qualify for disability? According to this website she can if she has a life threatening illness. She is being charged over $50.00 a treatment and she needs several on a weekly basis. Her husband is the only one with a social security check. And they CANNOT afford these cancer treatments. How do they expect her to pay? Please help.

  2. Klaire Malkenhorst says:

    You can not get social security disability if you have never worked. You can get Supplemental Security Income (SSI)if you have not worked. This administered by SSA but not funded by SSA.
    SSI is financed by general funds of the U.S. Treasury—personal income taxes, corporation taxes and other taxes.

    The following is incorrect:

    Disability
    One way that you can collect social security benefits if you have never worked is if you are disabled. The social security benefits program is also available to people who are disabled and unable to work a job that is sufficient enough to provide an adequate stream of income. Disabilities covered under this vary significantly and can include blindness, paralysis, life threatening illnesses, and mental disabilities.

  3. June says:

    I was denied any disability benefit for stage 4 breast cancer. I worked 14 years ago and needs to work 5 consecutive years more before i can qualify for any benefit from social security, but with my condition , it is impossible for me to find and do work. With my continuous chemo treatments, i am too weak to work. I need help, my husbands income is not enough for a family of 5. What help is available to me or my family? Please advice.

  4. Jeff Bowman says:

    I’m sorry to hear your situation. I am a retired Army and have known many fellow soldiers who had similer issues with thare family members.The soldier would declare that thare mother,father brother sister etc, is thare legal dependent. That would enable them to recieve the same benifits as the Active duty members.this is usually done when the family member has no spouse to take care of them and the service members takes on the responcibility.

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