Office of Inspector General



The job of the Inspector General and his staff is to initiate and follow through on investigations that are to include audits of the field operations that are run by the National and Community Service Trust Act of 1993. The OIG has similar authority as the Inspector General of the United Nations as relates to overseeing the activities of member programs running under the protection and monetary support of the Service Trust Act of 1993.

What Does The Office Of Inspector General Do?

The OIG is to make audits, visit, and conduct investigations in an independent and impartial manner of programs operated by the National and Community Service Trust Act. The purpose of OIG is to reveal fraudulent schemes that might be operating under the guise of the National and Community Service Trust Act.

How Far Do They Go?

The OIG has the power to investigate all programs being conducted by any part of the Trust Act of 1993. In addition, they are to help manage the affairs of the community participants to assist in more economically as well as efficiently operating the programs that are a legitimate part of the Trust Act of 1993.

Audits

The Office of the Inspector General conducts audits of the Corporation. The OIG is directly responsible to report on any fraudulent activities occurring with the programs being conducted by those member of the Corporation who are accountable for their activities and actions. The OIG has been an ongoing supervisory office since 1993. In 1994, Bill Clinton combined the activities that were a part of the Community Trust Act of 1993 into one Corporatio. The Corporation for National and Community Service joined three national programs, Senior Companions, Foster Grandparents and RSVP in one program known as Senior Corps.

Senior Corps became a part of the Community Trust Act of 1993 along with AmeriCorps and Learn and Serve America.



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