How Does The Retired & Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP)?



The Retired & Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP) serves over 62,000 organizations with its nearly 500,000 volunteers. Volunteers give 66 million hours of service in over 755 projects. These projects are in education, the environment, public safety, homeland security and many other areas. Volunteers help expand the reach of non-profit corporations, teach English to immigrants, renovate homes, and tutor children. Over 35,000 frail elderly were served by The Retired & Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP), doing shopping, light housekeeping and visiting.

Many Ways To Serve

There are three programs associated with The Retired & Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP). The Foster Grandparent Program works with disadvantaged children in Head Start, faith-based organizations and other youth groups. The Senior Companion Program sends volunteers to adults who have trouble with the simple tasks of daily life, from light housekeeping to cooking to shopping. And then there is the The Retired & Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP), which works in many different areas.

History Of RSVP

The Retired & Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP) was started in 1971. It is now under the auspices of the Corporation for National and Community Service, which was established in 1993. Its purpose is to connect Americans to volunteer opportunities through three programs: Senior Corps, Americorps, and Learn and Serve America. RSVP is part of Senior Corps.

How Does The Retired & Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP) Work?

A volunteer can work from one to forty hours per week. Usually, volunteers get no stipend, but sometimes they are reimbursed for expenses. Volunteers are covered for personal injury and liability arising from their volunteer work. Volunteers get training and supervision in order to make their volunteer experience a positive one. And volunteers are recognized every year at a Special Recognition program. A volunteer can look for RSVP in the phone book or on the internet.



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