Should I Drop Medicare Part A?

Medicare Part A covers many parts of a person’s health insurance. A recipient can drop it if he wants to do so, but seldom is it advantageous to do so. As long as the premiums are reasonable, keeping the government sponsored health-care plan gives a person back up insurance that he will have for the rest of his life most likely. There are times when a person may want to drop Medicare Part A.

Dropping Medicare Part A for a Younger Person Coming Off of Disability

A person under retirement age who receives Medicare coverage as a result of a disability claim may have to drop Part A eventually if the claim is not permanent. He probably will not do so as long as the judge who reviewed his case declares him still disabled.

If a person goes back to work and finds he has a good health care plan that covers more than Medicare Part A, he can drop this coverage, although it is probably a good idea to keep Medicare Parts B & D to make sure the cost of medical test and other forms of care that are needed from time to time.

What if I have Coverage from the Veteran’s Administration?

The Veteran’s Administration offers good health care insurance, but there is still a reason why a patient may want to keep Medicare Part A instead of dropping it. The VA insurance usually only works at VA hospitals and it does not apply to facilities that take place outside of governmental care.

Veteran’s Administration Hospitals do not exist in every city, either. They are usually only built in metropolitan areas and some people drive an hour or more to get to the nearest VA hospital. Keeping Medicare Part A can save an older Veteran an unnecessary hassle.

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