Can I Refuse Medicare?





When a person reaches 65 and receives retirement benefits, he may wonder if he has to take Medicare. Although there are many reasons to take Medicare, including making sure a person has health care insurance for the rest of his life.

A person with the means or who does not want to add to the national debt may wonder if he or she can refuse Medicare. A person can refuse Medicare coverage, but there are good reasons why he should not do so.

Refusing Different Parts of Medicare Coverage

Medicare Part A covers hospitalization services. The government does not charge premiums for people who qualify for the program. A person can choose not to sign up for Part A, but there is usually no reason not to do so.

Medicare Part B usually costs the person $96.40 per month. People with a higher income may pay slightly higher premiums. The premiums are usually deducted from the paycheck. A social security recipient with limited income who relies on this check may choose to opt out of the program, but he may want to see if he can get help from Medicaid or Medicare programs first.

Choosing to Refuse Medicare

A person does not have to take Medicare. Part A or B, but he must fill out paperwork stating his intentions to refuse Medicare. Individually choosing not to participate in the Medicare program is not a lifelong decision. A person cannot re-enroll in the program later if his economic circumstances change.

Some people, such as those with end-stage renal failure will find themselves automatically covered by the program even if they did not apply. The doctors and the hospitals know whom they need to bill and the paperwork they need to fill out in this case. Medicare provides broad ranges of coverage, but sometimes a person may have better health care insurance.



14 Responses to “Can I Refuse Medicare?”

  1. ann nycz says:

    I am covered by husband’s federal policy. I was told by them I am completely covered by his policy. He does not turn 65 for two years. I will be 65 in Jan. of this year. My question is how do I opt out of accepting Medicare? There does not seem to be an easy way. I was told by Medicare to call Social Security but they are not answering the phones. I do not want to spend the extra money for coverage I already have.
    Thank You

  2. Rick Jacoby says:

    Dear Sirs;

    I am confused with what maybe a typo. You say “Individually choosing not to participate in the Medicare program is not a lifelong decision. A person cannot re-enroll in the program later if his economic circumstances change.”
    Minor detail, don’t you mean “Individuals” not “Individually”? But most important, which do you mean, an Individual may choose not to participate in the Medicare program is not a lifelong decision. Or, person CANNOT re-enroll in the program later if his economic circumstances change.? Can he or can’t he? I really need to know. Thank you kindly, Rick

  3. pat says:

    My husband is 100% service connected with the VA and is covered by EVERYTHING with them. Does he HAVE or will this additional cost be a benefit to him or not?

  4. Joseph Rogers says:

    Please respond to Rick Jacoby question listed above. It is very important. I do believe that you have a significant error in the information posted and it is exactly the information that I need to know.
    I want to refuse Medicare part A. Would this be a permanent,lifelong decision or can I later opt in by changing my mind?

  5. Peter Richardson says:

    How can I refuse Medicare Parts A and B ?

    If there is a form for the “paperwork,” please tell me how to get it on the internet or otherwise.

    I have good/better insurance which will cease as soon as I go on Medicare.

    Thanks.

    • Charles E Brewer says:

      I have full benefits with the VA and I do not want to participate in Medicare at all. Can I do this?’
      Thank you.
      Charles E Brewer

  6. Laureen says:

    “Individually choosing not to participate in the Medicare program is not a lifelong decision. A person cannot re-enroll in the program later if his economic circumstances change”

    Should this read “a person can re-enroll….”

  7. Sylvia Whatley says:

    I reacived a letter from SS, and I’m told that beginning this month you will duduct $99.00 for medicare. I have insurance through my husband’s minitary retirement, and do not wish to use medicare. Can you revert this because i need every penny I cvan get.

  8. Tim Traynor says:

    Has anyone responded to the question regarding the contradictions in the phrasing about weather a person can re enroll in medicare once it has been declined? I can’t find one

  9. Theresa says:

    My mother refused the Plan A insurance at 65 and is now 89 and in need of it. How do I go about getting her enrolled and what does it cost?

  10. Donna says:

    It has been my understanding that if you opt out of Medicare in any way, you also forfeit any SS benefit check you are otherwise eligible to receive. Any way you slice it, it just seems wrong.

  11. Patricia says:

    My brother opted out of Medicare, but still receives his full social security check.

  12. Patricia says:

    My brother has opted out of Medicare. He is a Vietnam Vet. Can he get treatment through a veterans’ hospital without having Medicare?

  13. Arlo Richardson says:

    Nearly 68, realizing I have ‘paid in’ I’ve chosen not to enroll in SS or Medicare. I reject any association with federal government. I enjoy working & being independant. Yet, the Feds cannot take away my rights to these earned benefits…if and when I decide to use them.

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